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what is nonspecific white matter hyperintensities ?

Asked By: luobo1689 | Last Updated: 2022-04-28

what is nonspecific white matter hyperintensities?

White matter hyperintensities (WMH) is a non-specific term that refers to white matter (WM) signal hyperintensity areas on T2 weighted MRI scans, and correlates with WM rarefaction (leucoaraiosis) as defined on CT scans. The main risk factors associated with development of WMH are older age and blood hypertension.

Long,What causes nonspecific white matter hyperintensities?

Incident stroke Indeed, age and hypertension are the main predictors of white matter hyperintensities,69 70 and other vascular risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, and history of vascular disease were also shown to be associated with lesions in white matter.

Correspondingly,Should I worry about white matter hyperintensities?

Conclusion White matter hyperintensities predict an increased risk of stroke, dementia, and death. Therefore white matter hyperintensities indicate an increased risk of cerebrovascular events when identified as part of diagnostic investigations, and support their use as an intermediate marker in a research setting.

In this way,Is it normal to have white matter hyperintensities?

White matter hyperintensities are common in MRIs of asymptomatic individuals, and their prevalence increases with age from approximately 10% to 20% in those approximately 60 years old to close to 100% in those older than 90 years.

Likewise,What does unspecified white matter in the brain mean?

White matter disease is a disease that affects the nerves that link various parts of the brain to each other and to the spinal cord. These nerves are also called white matter. White matter disease causes these areas to decline in their functionality. This disease is also referred to as leukoaraiosis.

Related Question Answers Found

How do you treat white matter hyperintensities?

There isn't a specific treatment. The goal is to treat the cause of the damage and stop the disease from getting worse. Your doctor may prescribe medicines to lower your blood pressure or cholesterol.

Is white matter disease the same as white matter hyperintensities?

When these white matter changes are seen on MRI, they are usually referred to as WMHs, or white matter lesions. WMHs are typically defined as hyperintense on proton-density, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and T2-weighted images, without prominent hypointensity on T1-weighted scans.

How common are white matter hyperintensities by age?

We found that white matter hyperintensities were common at age 45 and that white matter hyperintensity volume was modestly associated with both lower childhood (ß = -0.08, P = 0.013) and adult IQ (ß=-0.15, P < 0.001).

What causes hyperintensities?

White matter hyperintensities can be caused by a variety of factors including ischemia, micro-hemorrhages, gliosis, damage to small blood vessel walls, breaches of the barrier between the cerebrospinal fluid and the brain, or loss and deformation of the myelin sheath.

Can white matter hyperintensities cause memory loss?

White Matter Hyperintensities Are Associated With Impairment of Memory, Attention, and Global Cognitive Performance in Older Stroke Patients. From the Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle, UK.

What is nonspecific white matter hyperintensities on MRI?

White matter hyperintensities (WMH) is a non-specific term that refers to white matter (WM) signal hyperintensity areas on T2 weighted MRI scans, and correlates with WM rarefaction (leucoaraiosis) as defined on CT scans. The main risk factors associated with development of WMH are older age and blood hypertension.

Are white matter lesions serious?

White matter lesions are among the most common incidental findings—which means the lesions have no clinical significance—on brain scans of people of any age. They may also reflect a mixture of inflammation, swelling, and damage to the myelin.

What are the symptoms of white matter on the brain?

While white matter disease has been associated with strokes, cognitive loss, and dementia, it also has some physical and emotional symptoms such as balance problems, falls, depression, and difficulty multitasking (e.g., walking and talking.)